All change: climate change reporting, uncovered

The quality and quantity of climate change content in December year-end annual reports has undergone a definitive shift for the better. 

In our latest research piece, we identify emerging best-practice and showcase some of the best examples available.

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The quality and quantity of climate change content in December year-end annual reports has undergone a definitive shift for the better. 

In our latest research piece, we identify emerging best-practice and showcase some of the best examples available.

Three big takeaways from our research:  

1. Climate change reporting is now mainstream. 

A clear majority of FTSE 100 reporters are responding to the recommendations of the Taskforce for Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), something that was considered a minority pursuit just two years ago. And many don’t stop there, giving over substantial dedicated sections to their environmental context, policies and actions or mentioning the topic several times throughout their report.

2. Serious needn’t mean dull.

Some of the most sophisticated reporters have begun to offer better structured, more visually engaging TCFD and climate change content. This has the dual benefit of expanding the potential audience for this material, as well as keeping investors awake and engaged.

3. Reporters should get going ASAP.

IR teams are fielding more and more questions from all sorts of investors on climate change and the environment. Ideally, they’ll be able to refer investors to a credible annual report that covers this pressing issue. And, given the FCA’s recent proposal to add TCFD-aligned reporting to the Listing Rules, there’s very likely only one reporting season left before this sort of reporting becomes compulsory, in any case.

If you’d like to see a copy of our full research, including several new best-practice examples, just drop us a line at hello@friendstudio.com